Monthly Archives: January 2020

WCDSB School Closed on Tuesday February 4th, 2020

WCDSB Schools Closed on Tuesday February 4th, 2020

WCDSB Schools Closed on Tuesday, February 4, 2020

The Ontario English Catholic Teachers’ Association (OECTA) has announced that all of its members will be engaging in a one-day strike on Tuesday, February 4. This decision affects all Catholic district school boards in Ontario.

 

As a result of this strike, all Waterloo Catholic District School Board elementary and secondary schools will be closed on February 4.

 

All WCDSB extended day programs will be open for the day as usual (7 a.m. to 6 p.m.) for students currently registered in the program.

 

Secondary school credit courses, hair styling courses and culinary arts courses offered at the WCDSB’s St. Louis Adult Learning & Continuing Education Centres campuses will be cancelled on February 4. St. Louis guidance and correspondence services will also be unavailable on February 4. All other St. Louis programs will be open and running on their normal schedules.

 

Community use of schools activities will continue as scheduled.

 

OECTA’s previously announced administrative job actions will remain in effect before and after February 4.

 

As before, we remain hopeful the two sides will return to the bargaining table quickly and will come to a fair and respectful agreement that serves the best interests of our students.

 

 

 

Jo Goossens

Principal

St. Elizabeth Catholic Elementary School

50 Adler Drive

Cambridge, ON

N3C 4B7

 

Phone: 519-651-0400

Fax: 519-651-0409

 

Wuhan Novel Coronavirus

Ministry of Health

Office of Chief Medical of Health

Public Health

393 University Ave 21st Floor

Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M2

Tel: 416 212-3831

Fax: 416 325-8412

January 27, 2020
Dear school community members: Re: Wuhan novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) As you will likely know, on January 25, 2020, Ontario identified its first presumptive confirmed case for the Wuhan novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). Today, January 27, 2020, Ontario has confirmed that the wife of the first case has tested positive for the virus at Ontario’s public health laboratory.
The health and well-being of Ontarians, including and especially our students and school staff, is Ontario’s top priority. Students, parents and school communities should rest assured that the province is working together in close cooperation with its partners in both the education and health care sectors to ensure the continued safety and well-being of students and staff.
These presumptive confirmed cases were not unexpected and the health system’s response has ensured that the risk to the general public from these cases has been minimized. The first patient was promptly identified prior to transport to the local hospital, health care workers wore appropriate personal protective equipment, and the patient was immediately placed in isolation, where they have remained. The second case has been in self-isolation since arriving in Toronto. These presumptive positive cases do not change the overall risk to Ontario, which is still considered low.
While this issue continues to emerge, we anticipate in the coming weeks that there may be additional cases identified in Ontario, other parts of Canada, and other countries who have individuals with travel history to the impacted area or other significant epidemiological links.
Human coronaviruses are common throughout the world and include a range of illnesses from the common cold to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). They can cause mild, moderate or severe respiratory illness in some people. Symptoms of the 2019-nCoV include fever, cough and difficulty breathing and studies are underway to try and understand this virus better. As of today, cases of this new disease have been identified in other areas of China, Thailand, Macau, Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea, Japan, Taiwan and in the United States, among others. We continue to monitor this situation closely along with our local and federal public health colleagues. The 2019-nCoV virus has been identified at the same time that influenza (also known as the flu) and many other respiratory viruses are circulating in Ontario, which is common at this time of the year. The precautions to protect yourself against common respiratory ailments can also be used to help protect against coronaviruses, including 2019-nCoV.
Members of the public are advised to take the usual measures to reduce the risk of transmission of the flu and respiratory illness, which include:
• get a yearly influenza vaccination, available from clinics and pharmacies (for flu only);
• wash your hands frequently and thoroughly with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer;
• cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze;
• if you don’t have a tissue, sneeze or cough into your sleeve or arm; and
• if you or your family members are ill, stay home.
Residents who return from recent international travel with history of travel to affected area and become ill with respiratory signs and symptoms such as cough and fever should report their travel history to any health professional, or emergency department staff, when they visit. Christine Elliott, Deputy Premier and Minister of Health, recently expanded monitoring protocols by making this novel coronavirus reportable to public health by a health professional so that if potential cases are identified in your area, the relevant local public health unit can quickly and effectively take all necessary measures to investigate, complete lab tests, and do case and contact management to prevent and control further spread of the infection.. Information has also been provided to hospitals to increase their screening processes for individuals who present with signs and symptoms of this new virus and have travelled to Wuhan, China. This will help ensure cases are identified promptly and actions taken to prevent its spread.
More Information can be found on the following websites: Ontario Ministry of Health:
www.ontario.ca/coronavirus
Find your Local Public Health Unit:
http://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/common/system/services/phu/locations.aspx
Public Health Agency of Canada: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection.html
Government of Canada Travel Advice and Advisory: https://travel.gc.ca/travelling/advisories/pneumonia-china
Sincerely,
Dr. David Williams
Ontario Chief Medical Officer of Health

JK Registration For 2020/2021

St. Elizabeth Catholic Elementary School

JK REGISTRATION FOR 2020/2021

Junior Kindergarten registration

For children born in 2016

&

Kindergarten registration

For children born in 2015

(who have not previously attended Junior Kindergarten)

 

 

 

Register Online or drop by St. Elizabeth School during regular school office hours to pick up the Kindergarten Registration package or call the secretary at

519-651-0400 to have the paperwork sent home with a sibling.

 

 

Appointments are being booked for

TUES, FEB. 11 from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. or WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12 from 1:45 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Please call the above telephone number to set up an appointment time.

 

Your child’s birth certificate or other legal proof of your child’s age, a Catholic Baptismal Certificate of either parent or child and proof of address are required when registering your child for Kindergarten.

 

 

The child’s mother, father or legal guardian is required to be present when returning registration paperwork. It is not necessary to bring your child to this appointment.

.

 

 

  1. Goossens, Principal                                                              L. Pachereva, Secretary

 

 

Parking on School Premises

Parking on School Premises

 

This is another reminder to all parents that there should be no parking on school premises, and no stopping on the driveway in front of the school entrance and daycare to drop off or pick up children. The driveway is for buses and emergency vehicles only. The parking spots in front of the school are for staff and visitors on school business, and are not to be used when dropping off or picking up children before and after school. The parking spots close to the driveway exit are for the use of daycare staff only.

 

Parking is permitted on the road directly in front of the school, except for the area directly in front of the intersection with Patton Drive.

 

Thank you for helping to keep our school community safe

 

 

Update on Extended Day Program on January 21

Important Update re: WCDSB Extended Day Programs on January 21

Important Update: On January 21, 2020 all WCDSB extended day programs will be OPEN for the day as usual (7 a.m. to 6 p.m.) for students currently registered in the program.

A previous communication indicated extended day programs would not operate that day.

An updated version of that earlier message is provided below.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.

 

 

Jo Goossens

Principal

St. Elizabeth Catholic Elementary School

50 Adler Drive

Cambridge, ON

N3C 4B7

 

Phone: 519-651-0400

Fax: 519-651-0409

 

8th Grade Parent Night

ATTENTION

  1. BENEDICT C.S.S. INVITES YOU TO:

8th Grade Parent Night!

THURSDAY JANUARY 16TH, 2020

AT ST. BENEDICT CATHOLIC SECONDARY SCHOOL

COME SHOWCASE / SEE WHAT BENNIES HAS TO OFFER!

6:30 – 7:15 PM Welcome and presentation (Gym)

7:15 – 8:30 PM Open House

For Open House please be ready to welcome visitors for 7pm

If you require any set up or have any questions, please contact Lesley.otoole@wcdsb.ca

Please park in the back lot by the gymnasiums

 

A Celebration of People: “Success for Each, A Place for All”

WCDSB SCHOOLS CLOSED ON TUESDAY JANUARY 21, 2020

WCDSB SCHOOLS CLOSED ON TUESDAY JANUARY 21st, 2020

WCDSB Schools Closed on Tuesday, January 21, 2020

The Ontario English Catholic Teachers’ Association (OECTA) has announced that all of its members will be engaging in a one-day strike on Tuesday, January 21. This decision affects all Catholic district school boards in Ontario.

 

As a result of this strike, all Waterloo Catholic District School Board elementary and secondary schools will be closed on January 21.

 

Additionally, all WCDSB extended day programs will also close for the day.

 

Secondary school credit courses offered at the WCDSB’s St. Louis Adult Learning & Continuing Education Centres campuses will be cancelled on January 21, but all other St. Louis programs will be open and running on their normal schedules.

 

Community use of schools activities will continue as scheduled.

 

OECTA’s previously announced administrative job actions will remain in effect before and after January 21.

 

As before, we remain hopeful the two sides will return to the bargaining table quickly and will come to a fair and respectful agreement that serves the best interests of our students.

 

 

 

Jo Goossens

Principal

St. Elizabeth Catholic Elementary School

50 Adler Drive

Cambridge, ON

N3C 4B7

 

Phone: 519-651-0400

Fax: 519-651-0409

 

Enjoying Vegetables All Year Long

 Enjoying Vegetables All Year Long

 

It can be challenging to find creative ways to fill half your plate with vegetables and fruits throughout our long Canadian winters. Our markets and grocery stores may not be filled with as many local options as they are during warmer seasons. However, you may be surprised by how much local produce is available throughout the winter months in Ontario. Locally produced vegetables such as beets, potatoes, cabbage, carrots, parsnips, rutabaga, squash, mushrooms, leeks and sweet potatoes are all available this time of year. Frozen vegetables are another healthy and affordable choice. If you are looking for some inspiration on ways to incorporate vegetables into your family mealtimes this winter, here are a few fun ideas.

 

Add frozen or winter vegetables to dishes

  • Add sweet potato or squash to homemade chili and soups.
  • Add shredded cabbage to salads – purple cabbage adds a splash of colour.
  • Add leeks or mushrooms to a frittata or omelette.
  • Add rutabaga, turnip or celery root to mashed potatoes.
  • Blend cooked beets or sweet potatoes into a hummus recipe.
  • Add frozen vegetables to stir-fries, soups, casseroles, pasta dishes or serve them as a side dish at meals.

 

Make winter vegetables fun for kids

  • Make roasted parsnip sticks; they are a fun finger food.
  • Cut and roast acorn squash in slices that look like smiles.
  • Try spiralized sweet potatoes or carrots as a fun new way to serve these vegetables.
  • Roast sweet potato or butternut squash medallions and let kids use cookie cutters to make fun shapes.

Find some winter vegetable inspiration in the recipes below

 

Visit Foodland Ontario’s availability guide to find out when Ontario fruits and vegetables are in season: https://www.ontario.ca/foodland/page/availability-guide.

The Umbrella Project

PARENT NEWSLETTER – AUTHENTICITY!
We are excited to kick of this moth with a new skill that will help your children feel good about
who they are, boost their confidence and stand up for their beliefs. That skill is authenticity !
How will authenticity help my child?
Authenticity is the ability to be our genuine selves, staying true to our values and beliefs even
under pressure, while still adapting to the world around us. Authenticity comes from having
actions that match the words we say and not trying to be someone else to impress others. It’s very
difficult to feel unconditionally loved and accepted without this critical skill.
Research shows that authenticity helps kids stand up for what they think is right, which reduces
bullying and social stress. As parents, we can do a lot this year to work against the concerning
trends in childhood mental health just by helping kids embrace and feel confident in their true
selves.
With increased authenticity also comes increased self-confidence and trustworthiness,
characteristics that will help your children create strong and lasting friendships which we know to
be critical to their long-term wellbeing.
AUTHENTICITY TIP #1
Tap into your curiosity
We all want our children to be happy. In fact, we often want this so much that our own parent
anxiety about their happiness takes over and leads us to push our kids into achievement in areas
they may not care about. This pattern is usually done with the childs’ best interests at heart but
often leads to increasing anxiety and a loss of that childs’ true passions and interest.
Start the new year by slowing down and listening to your child with the purpose of understanding
what it is like to be them. Look out for their strengths and interests and really check that you
know them on an authentic level. Notice what games they are drawn to, what subjects catch their
interest, where they invest their free time. Kids naturally want to please their parents, friends and
teachers and it’s easy for them to lose a sense of what they really care about in exchange for all of
this pleasing.
Try to avoid having your child build their persona around what others want them to be and
instead help them feel good about who they are.
AUTHENTICITY TIP #2
Help your child shape their authentic self
Your child is crafting the story of their identity – listen closely. As children become more aware of
themselves and their position in the world, they start to crave something we all want, a sense of
unconditional belonging. Each experience a child has builds on their sense of identity, and they
slowly start to develop the story of who they are. Who we are is in fact a story that is pretty open
to interpretation. Some of the most formative experiences in our story are the ones that made us
feel accepted or on the other side, isolated.
As your child’s story emerges, start to look for conditions of worth. Conditions of worth are the
things that we feel will give us value to others. These can range from being pretty, smart, funny,
strong, to never getting upset, never losing etc. While these aren’t bad qualities, we don’t want our
children’s self esteem to be tied to these, creating anxiety every time they can’t fully meet the
expectation. This can cause a mix up in their authentic story and starts to create a social mask that
they need to put on to feel accepted. Ever wonder why your funny friend doesn’t seem to know
when to turn it off? It’s likely that they have created a condition of worth around being funny.
Unfortunately, what this mask actually does is prevents them from ever feeling unconditionally
accepted.
When you recognize these conditions of worth in your child, counter this message with two key
parenting strategies:
1. Unconditional love and respect (harder than it sounds)
While most parents can say that they love their children unconditionally, it is not the message we
give but the message they receive that is most important. To learn more about this, read this blog
post:

To streamline the message you are trying to give with what they are actually receiving, try not to
tie good behaviour with love and connection and bad behaviour with anger. This subtly tells kids
that your affection does in fact have conditions and that they are less lovable when they aren’t
doing what you want them to. Instead, try to keep anger out of discipline and love out of praise.
Avoid phrases like “I love you…you’re so kind” when your child is doing well at their condition of
worth. Praise them without tying it back to your love for them. When discipline is necessary, try
to zoom in a little and see the feeling – sadness, anger, jealousy, frustration. It will help you keep
your cool and not bring anger into the equation. Remember their feelings are normal and
suppressing them with anger doesn’t make that feeling go away; but it can lead to a child who has
trouble sharing their true feelings.
2. Parent in the grey zone
Help your kids find the normal exceptions to their conditions of worth in the grey zone. The more
black and white our view of the world is, the easier it is to get caught up in our conditions of
worth. In the black and white world we are either one way or another – smart or not, kind or not,
funny or not (read more in our Growth Mindset blog series). We can’t be any of these things all
the time and this is a clear set up for never feeling comfortable with your imperfections. This is
especially true if, each time you fail at one of your conditions, you feel less loved or accepted. The
permission to be imperfect and human like everyone else is a great way to alleviate anxiety and
the Grey Zone is where this permission lives.
It’s almost impossible to live an authentic life if you can’t take ownership for your mistakes;
however, ownership can be difficult for children. In fact, many of the adults I know struggle with
this skill too.
AUTHENTICITY TIP #3
Is there a grain of truth?
Let’s face it – it often feels easier to shift the blame to someone or something else, rather than
looking inside and owning up to our mistakes. In reality, the situations we find ourselves in are
much more complex than that. There is often more than one factor involved in our
mistakes/conflicts and almost always, some piece of it that we can accept responsibility for. The
ability to do this is big part of healthy relationship-building for your child.
The next time your child is facing a conflict, ask them if they can pick out a grain of truth in the
situation: something little that they can take ownership and responsibility for. This can be
especially effective for sibling conflicts, as well as peer and parent relationships.
This strategy will help them start with small, manageable things and eventually to owning bigger
pieces of their mistakes. The strategy shows your child the relief that comes with ownership and
telling the truth.
Does your child often get upset at the suggestion that they may have something to do with the
conflict they find themselves in? Working towards owning up to mistakes is a great way to build
their authenticity, help them learn from those mistakes and prevent them from having to carry the
burden of that mistake long-term.
This can be a difficult skill for some to nurture, so make honesty the easiest option for your child
by praising them every time they are able to find their piece of responsibility in the situation.
AUTHENTICITY TIP #4
Stop focusing on perfection
Remind your child often, and in as many ways as you can, that the goal of life isn’t development to
perfection.
This important conversation builds almost every skill in your child’s umbrella, and authenticity is
no exception. We dove into this in November when we discussed growth mindset and it’s worth a
mention again as we work towards developing a child who feels comfortable being themselves.
We are all climbing a mountain in life that doesn’t have a top and when we imagine that there is a
summit to climb, it can lead to a life of struggle trying to get somewhere that doesn’t exist. Striving
for perfection can create a set of unattainable standards and this often leads to covering up
imperfections with a false exterior instead of being comfortable with who we are as humans,
imperfections and all.
Start by normalizing life’s challenges for kids: relationships have bumps, sometimes we do poorly
on tests, get injured and have tough days. When your child truly believes that these things are a
difficult (but normal) part of life that everyone experiences, their authentic selves will have a
chance to shine. Set goals for small incremental improvements instead of trying to get as close as
possible to perfection.
Parents of high achieving kids take note: these are the kids I’m seeing most in my practice for
anxiety. Remember that just because your child can achieve at a level of excellence now doesn’t
mean they won’t face challenges down the road. As these kids hit harder and harder challenges
they will often sacrifice all other aspects of their wellbeing to continue to achieve success
including sleep, friendships and relationships with their loved ones. We know that these are
critical to wellbeing and their absence takes a toll.
Make sure your children really understand that they don’t need to maintain a high level of success
at all times for love, acceptance or self-esteem. This false belief can become deeply ingrained in
their minds and cause a lot of anxiety when they can’t hit a desired target; so teach self-acceptance
now, in advance of these challenges.
Mistakes are an important part of learning and the fear of making mistakes might just be what is
holding your child back from being their true selves.
See this blog for a more detailed look at coaching children through the challenges of building
authenticity: https://umbrellaproject.co/category/authenticity/
Health and happiness,
Dr. Jen Forristal
Founder of the Umbrella Project
drjen@umbrellaproject.co